Grammars

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At the core of the DELPH-IN repository is agreement among partners on a shared set of linguistic assumptions (grounded in [http://hpsg.stanford.edu/ HPSG] and Minimal Recursion Semantics) and on a common formalism (i.e. logic) for linguistic description in typed feature structures. The formalism is implemented in several development and processing environments (that can serve differing purposes) and enables the exchange of grammars and lexicons across platforms. Formalism continuity, on the other hand, has allowed DELPH-IN researchers to develop several comprehensive, wide-coverage grammars of diverse languages that can be processed by a variety of software tools.
At the core of the DELPH-IN repository is agreement among partners on a shared set of linguistic assumptions (grounded in [http://hpsg.stanford.edu/ HPSG] and Minimal Recursion Semantics) and on a common formalism (i.e. logic) for linguistic description in typed feature structures. The formalism is implemented in several development and processing environments (that can serve differing purposes) and enables the exchange of grammars and lexicons across platforms. Formalism continuity, on the other hand, has allowed DELPH-IN researchers to develop several comprehensive, wide-coverage grammars of diverse languages that can be processed by a variety of software tools.
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Linguistic resources that are available as part of the DELPH-IN open-source repository include broad-coverage grammars for English, German, and Japanese, as well as a set of ‘emerging’ grammars for French, Korean, Modern Greek, Norwegian, Portuguese, and Spanish. Additionally, a proprietory grammar for Italian (developed by CELI s.r.l. in Torino) uses the exact same DELPH-IN formalism (and many of the Matrix assumptions) and is available for licensing. Following is some more background information on select grammars:
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Linguistic resources that are available as part of the DELPH-IN open-source repository include broad-coverage grammars for English, German, and Japanese, as well as a set of ‘emerging’ grammars for other languages. Here is some background on a few of the most extensive grammars:
===[http://www.delph-in.net/erg/ LinGO English Resource Grammar (ERG)]===
===[http://www.delph-in.net/erg/ LinGO English Resource Grammar (ERG)]===
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:Being developed at the Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI) at Stanford University since 1993. The ERG was originally developed within the Verbmobil machine translation effort, but over the past few years has been ported to additional domains (most notably in an ecommerce and financial services self-help product that is marketed by a CSLI industrial affiliate) and significantly extended. The grammar includes a hand-built lexicon of around ten thousand lexemes and allows interfacing to external lexical resources (like COMLEX). The main grammar developer is Dan Flickinger, with contributions by (among others) Emily Bender, Rob Malouf, and Jeff Smith.
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:Being developed at the Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI) at Stanford University since 1993. The ERG was originally developed within the Verbmobil machine translation effort, but over the past few years has been ported to additional domains and significantly extended. The grammar includes a hand-built lexicon of over 35,000 lexemes and allows interfacing to external lexical resources (like COMLEX). The main grammar developer is Dan Flickinger, with contributions by (among others) Emily Bender, Rob Malouf, and Jeff Smith.
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===''[http://www.delph-in.net/grenouille La Grenouille]''===
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:The French Resource Grammar was originally designed as a tool for modeling selected linguistic phenomena by incorporating insights from ongoing research into the formal analysis of French in HPSG (Abeillé, Bonami, Boyé, Desmets, Godard, Miller, Sag, Tseng). In addition to basic clausal structures, the grammar provides a treatment of (for example) complex predicate constructions (compound tenses, causatives) and morpho-syntactic and phono-syntactic effects (clitic climbing, contraction, vowel elision, consonant liaison). La Grenouille, currently in its tadpole stage, is undergoing metamorphosis; a generation-enabled version has been made available for public distribution in mid-2006. Further inquiries can be addressed to Jesse Tseng, the primary developer at Loria (Nancy, France).
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===[http://www.delph-in.net/jacy/ JaCY Japanese Grammar]===
===[http://www.delph-in.net/jacy/ JaCY Japanese Grammar]===
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:Jacy is a large scale grammar of Japanese, currently mainly being used in the Jaen machine translaiton sytem.  The grammar is comparable in scope and size to the LinGO ERG and builds on the ChaSen package for word segmentation, morphological analysis, and a treatment of unknown words.  It has been developed at multiple sites.  It was originally developed at the German National Research Center in AI (DFKI GmbH) and Saarland University (both in Saarbrücken, Germany) then through cooperation with YY Technologies, later NTT Communications Research Laboratories and the National Institutue for Information Technologies, Japan and now Nanynag Technological University.  Melanie Siegel, Emily Bender and Francis Bond are the main developers.
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:Jacy is a large scale grammar of Japanese, currently mainly being used in the JaEn machine translaiton sytem.  The grammar builds on the ChaSen package for word segmentation, morphological analysis, and a treatment of unknown words.  It has been developed at multiple sites.  It was originally developed at the German National Research Center in AI (DFKI GmbH) and Saarland University (both in Saarbrücken, Germany) then through cooperation with YY Technologies, later NTT Communications Research Laboratories and the National Institutue for Information Technologies, Japan and now Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.  Melanie Siegel, Emily Bender and Francis Bond are the main developers.
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===[http://web.khu.ac.kr/~jongbok/projects/krg.html Korean Resource Grammar]===
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:A computational grammar for Korean currently under development by Jong-Bok Kim at Kyung Hee University and Jaehyung Yang at Kangnam University. The grammar, adopting the formalism of HPSG and Minimal Recursion Semantics, aims to develop an open-source grammar of Korean. The morphological analyzer we use for Korean is MACH. The grammar developing team has a close cooperation with the LinGO Research Laboratory at CSLI, Stanford, and the JaCY developer team. The current grammar covers basic sentence types, relative clauses, light verb constructions, case phenomena, auxiliary constructions, and so forth.
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===[http://www.delph-in.net/mgrg Modern Greek Resource Grammar]===
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:A computational grammar for Modern Greek currently being developed at the [http://www.coli.uni-sb.de/groups/HU/ Department of Computational Linguistics] of Saarland University. The grammar includes, among others, analyses of basic clause syntax, word order and cliticization phenomena in Modern Greek, valence alternating and ditratransitive constructions, subject-verb inversion, subordinate clauses, relative clauses, UDCs, raising and control, politeness contructions, as well as the implementation of the syntax of noun phrases, passives, and coordination phenomena. Valia Kordoni and Julia Neu are the main developers of the Modern Greek Resource Grammar.
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===[http://www.ling.hf.ntnu.no/forskning/norsource/ NorSource Norwegian Grammar]===
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:Under development at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. Similar in spirit to the other resource grammars, NorSource aims for a re-usable and precise grammar of Norwegian, adapting the theory of HPSG and Minimal Recursion Semantics to a language (family) that arguably presents a couple of novel challenges to existing work within the HPSG framework. Grammar development is partially funded by the EU [http://www.project-deepthought.net/ Deep-Thought] initiative and currently focuses on core syntactic constructions, argument structure and the syntax–semantics interface, and interfacing to an existing computational lexicon for Norwegian. Lars Hellan and Petter Haugereid at NTNU are the main NorSource developers, working with a team of other researchers and students.
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===[http://www.upf.edu/pdi/iula/montserrat.marimon/spanish_resource_grammar.html  Spanish Resource Grammar (SRG)]===
===[http://www.upf.edu/pdi/iula/montserrat.marimon/spanish_resource_grammar.html  Spanish Resource Grammar (SRG)]===
:A computational grammar for Spanish currently being developed at Institut Universitari de Lingüística Aplicada of Universitat Pompeu Fabra. MSG development is currently funded by the Juan de la Cierva program (MEC, Spain) within the TEXTERM-II project (BFF2003-2111). Montserrat Marimon and Núria Bel are the main developers of the SRG.
:A computational grammar for Spanish currently being developed at Institut Universitari de Lingüística Aplicada of Universitat Pompeu Fabra. MSG development is currently funded by the Juan de la Cierva program (MEC, Spain) within the TEXTERM-II project (BFF2003-2111). Montserrat Marimon and Núria Bel are the main developers of the SRG.

Revision as of 04:20, 12 February 2013

DELPH-IN members share a commitment to re-usable, multi-purpose resources and active exchange. Based on contributions from several members and joint development over many years, an open-source repository of software and linguistic resources has been created that has wide usage in education, research, and application building.

At the core of the DELPH-IN repository is agreement among partners on a shared set of linguistic assumptions (grounded in HPSG and Minimal Recursion Semantics) and on a common formalism (i.e. logic) for linguistic description in typed feature structures. The formalism is implemented in several development and processing environments (that can serve differing purposes) and enables the exchange of grammars and lexicons across platforms. Formalism continuity, on the other hand, has allowed DELPH-IN researchers to develop several comprehensive, wide-coverage grammars of diverse languages that can be processed by a variety of software tools.

Linguistic resources that are available as part of the DELPH-IN open-source repository include broad-coverage grammars for English, German, and Japanese, as well as a set of ‘emerging’ grammars for other languages. Here is some background on a few of the most extensive grammars:

LinGO English Resource Grammar (ERG)

Being developed at the Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI) at Stanford University since 1993. The ERG was originally developed within the Verbmobil machine translation effort, but over the past few years has been ported to additional domains and significantly extended. The grammar includes a hand-built lexicon of over 35,000 lexemes and allows interfacing to external lexical resources (like COMLEX). The main grammar developer is Dan Flickinger, with contributions by (among others) Emily Bender, Rob Malouf, and Jeff Smith.

JaCY Japanese Grammar

Jacy is a large scale grammar of Japanese, currently mainly being used in the JaEn machine translaiton sytem. The grammar builds on the ChaSen package for word segmentation, morphological analysis, and a treatment of unknown words. It has been developed at multiple sites. It was originally developed at the German National Research Center in AI (DFKI GmbH) and Saarland University (both in Saarbrücken, Germany) then through cooperation with YY Technologies, later NTT Communications Research Laboratories and the National Institutue for Information Technologies, Japan and now Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Melanie Siegel, Emily Bender and Francis Bond are the main developers.

Spanish Resource Grammar (SRG)

A computational grammar for Spanish currently being developed at Institut Universitari de Lingüística Aplicada of Universitat Pompeu Fabra. MSG development is currently funded by the Juan de la Cierva program (MEC, Spain) within the TEXTERM-II project (BFF2003-2111). Montserrat Marimon and Núria Bel are the main developers of the SRG.
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